2020 in pictures |  The Scientist Magazine®


SAM KRIEGMAN

In January of this year, researchers used cells taken from a frog embryo to create “engineered organisms” designed for various tasks. Here a Xenobot shuffles across the bottom of a Petri dish.

NIAID RML

This photo published in February shows the characteristic “crown” of the spikes on SARS-CoV-2, after which the coronavirus is named.

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MUNICH / ERTÜRK LAB

Scientists in Germany reported in February about a new technique for tissue cleaning with which they can view intact human organs such as the kidney (above), brain, eye and thyroid.

UPMC

This white mouse received a leg transplant from a brown mouse. Thanks to a new method that mimics the mechanism by which tumors evade detection, the limb survived for more than 200 days, scientists reported in March.

BGI

In Shenzhen, China, BGI Genomics deployed the Huo-Yan Air Lab in April, an inflatable laboratory for analyzing SARS-CoV-2 samples, equipped with a medical waste exhaust system, qPCR instruments and genetic sequencers.

JORJA HENIKOFF

Steven Henikoff, an epigeneticist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, smiles from his new lab bench that was previously the counter in his laundry room before he started working from home in April.

NINA WESTERVELT

A union member representing faculty at the City University of New York protested in June against an announcement that the university system would lay off faculty members and cut courses.

In August, the SCU Lightning Complex Fire came dangerously close to the Lick Observatory, an astronomical research center in the hills above San Jose, California. Other field stations were damaged by a series of fires on the west coast this summer.

MATÍAS REBAK

Conservationists in Argentina are planning to release five adult jaguars into the Iberá wetlands, including the two-year-old Mbareté (picture). In November, The scientist reported on researchers’ efforts to understand how large apex predators – and their absence – affect ecosystem functioning.

C. GAEBLER ET AL, BIOARXIVE, 2020

An intestinal biopsy of a recovered COVID-19 patient shows traces of the SARS-CoV-2 virus (green) up to six months after infection, researchers reported in November.



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