According to new polls, the reluctance rate of Covid vaccines is falling among all Americans


A new poll on attitudes toward covid vaccination shows Americans are becoming increasingly excited about vaccinations, with the most positive change seen in black Americans over the past month.

According to a poll published Tuesday by KFF, around 55% of black adults said they had been vaccinated or will soon be vaccinated. This corresponds to an increase of 14 percentage points compared to February. The rate is now approaching that of Hispanics at 61% and whites at 64%. (Asian Americans were not surveyed in sufficient numbers to compare their answers with those of other races and ethnic groups.)

However, the survey found that 13% of respondents overall said they were “definitely not” vaccinated, indicating that significant hurdles remain in the country’s vaccination campaign. (KHN is the editorially independent newsroom of KFF, a non-profit organization that provides national health information.)

Of all the groups, Republicans and white Evangelical Christians were the most likely to say they will not be vaccinated. Almost 30% of each group said they “definitely won’t” get a shot.

And while the survey found that some arguments persuade reluctant people – such as the breakdown that the vaccines are nearly 100% effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths – these messages change almost nothing about the opinions of people who do have chosen not to be vaccinated.

Last week, President Joe Biden announced that the United States had given more than 100 million vaccine doses and had doubled its target to 200 million doses by early May. According to KFF’s survey, 32% said they had already received at least one dose and 30% said they wanted to receive it as soon as possible.

The survey also found that fewer people wait to see how others react to the vaccines before deciding to vaccinate. 17% say they fall into this “wait and see” group this month – down from 22% in February and 31% in February-January.

Young adults aged 18 to 29 and black adults were most likely to belong to this “waiting” group at 25% and 24%, respectively.

27 percent of Republicans and 35 percent of white Evangelical Christians said they had already received at least one dose, the survey found. 42 percent of Democrats said they had been vaccinated.

But Republicans and White Evangelical Christians, along with 21% of vital non-health workers and 20% of rural residents, were the most likely to say they “definitely won’t” be vaccinated. One in five Republicans said they were more likely to be vaccinated if former President Donald Trump urges them to.

People who said they were “definitely not going to get” a vaccine were asked to identify the main reason for their decision. The most common reason (17%) was that the vaccines are too new and not enough information is known about their long-term effects.

However, when the people in the camp were “definitely not” informed that scientists have been working on the technology used in the vaccines for around 20 years, it changed little in their opinion. Only about 6% said this argument made them more likely to receive the vaccine.

The survey found that some arguments won over those who had not yet made up their minds. Forty-one percent said they would be more likely to receive the vaccine after hearing the vaccines are nearly 100% effective at preventing hospital stays and deaths from Covid – the most effective message KFF tested.

Some said they were more likely to be vaccinated if it was easier to get on with their daily lives – or to make their daily lives easier.

Of the members of the “wait and see” group, half said they would be more likely to be vaccinated if offered during a routine medical appointment. And 37% said they would be more likely if their employer would arrange vaccinations on site at their workplace. 38 percent said they would be more likely if their employer offered to pay them an additional $ 200 for the vaccination.

Of those who haven’t been vaccinated or are planning to vaccinate soon, the survey found that travel restrictions might prove compelling. About 3 in 10 respondents said they would be more likely to be vaccinated if airlines asked for passengers to be vaccinated or if the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that vaccinated people could travel freely and, in most cases, none Would have to wear masks.

Still, 7% of those who said they “definitely not” said they would be more likely to do so if airlines and the CDC made these policy changes.

The survey also found that most unvaccinated people for the first time said they had enough information to know where and when to get a vaccine. Problems remain, however: Roughly 3 in 10 said they didn’t know if they were eligible in their state. Hispanic adults and those under 30 who earned less than $ 40,000 a year or did not have a college degree were most likely to respond.

The survey was conducted from March 15th to March 22nd among 1,862 adults and has an error rate of +/- 3 percentage points.

Related topics

Contact Send us a story tip





Source link

Posted in Health

Leave a Comment

Thanks for visiting get comfortable with the space, officially registering is the most important thing to do right now The first big project won’t start until your on board.